Human Capital theory explanation

Marginalism and the Higher Ed Paradox  June 19, 2012 – 01:57 am
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By now, you may be getting sick of reading articles and blog posts about the crisis in higher education. This post is different. It proposes an explanation of why students have been willing to pay more and more for undergraduate and professional degrees at the same time that these degrees are becoming both less scarce and more dumbed down. And that explanation rests on a simple and plausible economic hypothesis.

First, let me dispose of the idea that “college (and business school) is all about signaling.” The explanation I present allows signaling to represent a major part of the value of higher education, but it says that the historical increase in willingness to pay for education is not caused by an increase in its signaling value. (And the evidence for signaling or screening education premia, as opposed to human capital accumulation, is pretty thin anyway.) I’m certain signaling plays a role in creating value for certain degrees from certain institutions for certain people in certain situations. That it dominates the value proposition for college seems like a stretch.

My hypothesis is that it is precisely the dumbing down of U.S. education over the last decades that explains the increase in willingness to pay for education. The mechanism is diminishing marginal returns to education.

Source: StrategyProfs.net

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Okay, here are two great sources of income that

Have worked out for me.
Not sure how you handle hard work, but I'm serious about the landscaping thing. You can take an online course in small engines etc for about 700 and be finished in 9 months so you can repair your own equipment. Buy some used equipment and basic insurance. Read about plants in your area, read about types of grasses and the care required to maintain them. There are many books on this. I try to put cards in lawns that don't look well kept. You can take out a loan of 5 g's or less to cover these expenses.
Also, sell things on ebay. I buy name brand clothing and other items from goodwills and thrift stores and sell them for ten times the price online. For example, spend 60 bucks at goodwill and sell for 650. You just have to know what to look for.

My vacation to springfield has made me so.......

Depressed.
my family is crazy. and that's why i moved 2,000 miles away.
the good part of my vacation was all of the good (and extremely cheap) vintage stuff i scored at the local salvation army and goodwills.
if i still lived in springfield illinois, i've decided that i would make my living off of e-bay. no one realizes the value of the some of the stuff i was finding. i had to... like a child, so i told them i did *need* an explanation, and i expected one.
well, that was the last night there, and from then on, our trip was terrible. i really didn't want it to end on a bad note, so that was the reason i needed to know WHY my mom wasn't going to be in the pictures. how terrible. everyone started screaming and yelling, whilst my b.f. was downstairs.
bad times.

Props to Intellectual Property  — E-Commerce Times
Let's estimate this using the most inclusive definition of intellectual property: patents, copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, customer lists, business know-how, and other secret sauce. Relationship to Market Capitalization. An oft-cited statistic …

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